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The Robert Burns
See Below for our Robert Burns Cocktail Recipe

 

JANUARY 25 IS A TRULY SCOTTISH CELEBRATION. NOT ONLY DO WE REMEMBER SCOTLAND'S GREATEST POET, BUT WE DO SO WITH SOME GREAT SCOTTISH FARE - COCK-A-LEEKIE SOUP, HAGGIS, BASHT NEEPS AND CHAMPIT TATTIES, CLOOTIE DUMPLING, OATCAKES AND CHEESE AND, OF COURSE, WHISKY.

 

Robert Burns loved whisky, both for the drink itself and the conviviality that it inspires. He devoted a whole poem, Scotch Drink, to the subject. What starts out as a Bacchanalian celebration of Scotch, ends up as a reflection on poverty and the chances for happiness. Burns viewed whisky as a liberating drink that allowed the poor some small glimpse of a happy life. Something that Customs and Excise should leave well alone - there are more than a few people who would agree with that!

 

 Anyway enough of the maudlin, let's celebrate Burns as he would have wanted - with Scotland's national drink. Straight away this raises a number of questions: which whisky, how to serve it and should it be mixed?  Being honest, Burns probably wouldn't care just as long as you enjoy it and it livens up your evening. Just make sure it is Scotch and not some drink from foreign climes.

 

 If you do want something slightly different, there is a classic cocktail called the Robert Burns. There is some debate as to whom this drink is named after - it may have been the poet, but it could also have been a cigar salesman who frequented the bar in the Waldorf Astoria. This is a very adult cocktail that requires some care when making - it is very easy to overpower the drink. In a cocktail shaker with loads of ice, add two measures of good whisky, ¾ measure of sweet vermouth, a dash of orange bitters and a dash ofabsinthe (just a dash of both and no more). Stir and strain into a cocktail glass. Serve immediately. There a variation called the Bobby Burns made with Benedictine rather than bitters and absinthe, but I prefer the classic. (M.Earl)

 

 Finally I'll leave you with the thoughts of the great man himself, taken from his poem Scotch Drink:

 

 “Food fills the wame, an' keeps us livin;

 

Tho' life's a gift no worth receivin,

 

When heavy-dragg'd wi pine and grievin;

 

                                          But oil'd by thee,

 

The wheels o' life gae down-hill, scrievin,

 

                                          Wi' rattlin glee."

 

  

 

 

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